Monthly Archives: November 2010

(Almost) Kissing Babies in Chicago

Lincoln’s quietness during the election and its immediate aftermath was usual in his day. Senator Douglas broke tradition during the 1860 presidential canvas by personally campaigning throughout the country, but the norm was for the candidate to remain at home … Continue reading

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“You Must Take Sides”

In 1860 several states, including New York, declared November 29th Thanksgiving Day. One of the ways people celebrated Thanksgiving Day back then was by going to church and listening to long sermons by their preachers. On November 30th The New-York … Continue reading

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Bye, Bye, Redcoats!

Well, I can chalk up another one under the category “1860 Headlines that have Bewildered Me”: From The New-York Times November26, 1860: Evacuation Day. Parade of the Military. The First Brigade, under command of Gen. C.B. SPICER, consisting of the … Continue reading

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Palmetto Flag Gets Hissed!

But Not in the Palmetto State From The New-York Times November 27, 1860: BALTIMORE, Md., Monday, Nov. 24. An association calling themselves the “Southern Volunteers,” displayed the Palmetto flag from their place of meeting to-day. A large crowd was attracted … Continue reading

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Thanksgiving Perseverance

Yesterday morning I was reading a different genre (not the U.S. Civil War) and learned about Sarah Hale, who was a strong proponent of a national Thanksgiving Day. In 1860 several northern states had picked November 29th as their Thanksgiving … Continue reading

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News from the West

From The New-York Times November 26, 1860: FORT KEARNEY, Sunday, Nov. 25. The Pony Express from San Francisco 14th inst., passed here about 4 o’clock this afternoon. Considering the snow and bad weather in the mountains, this is making good … Continue reading

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If It Looks Like Nullification, …

… And It Acts Like Nullification In a section devoted to “Letters to the Editor” regarding the possible secession of southern states, The New-York Times included the following summary of an 1860 revision the Massachusetts government made to its Personal … Continue reading

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Thanksgiving: Charleston 1860

From The New-York Times. November 22, 1860: CHARLESTON, Wednesday, Nov. 21. Thanksgiving passed off with remarkable quietness. The American Sunday School Union this morning unfurled a white banner, with a palmetto tree, five stars and an open Bible, and the … Continue reading

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Why Alabama Will Probably Secede

Or, Is the Pot Calling the Kettle Black? From The New-York Times. November 20, 1860: MONTGOMERY, Ala., Tuesday, Nov. 13, 1860. Two days ago there was in this city a body of men who were in favor of preserving the … Continue reading

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Lincoln’s Asks for Fair Trial

From The New-York Times. November 19, 1860: We find the following paragraph in the Washington Star: “A gentleman of this city (a well-known lumber merchant) visiting Springfield, Ill., lately, on some land business, was taken to see Mr. LINCOLN by … Continue reading

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