Category Archives: The election of 1860

News from the presidential election of 1860

If It Looks Like Nullification, …

… And It Acts Like Nullification In a section devoted to “Letters to the Editor” regarding the possible secession of southern states, The New-York Times included the following summary of an 1860 revision the Massachusetts government made to its Personal … Continue reading

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Why Alabama Will Probably Secede

Or, Is the Pot Calling the Kettle Black? From The New-York Times. November 20, 1860: MONTGOMERY, Ala., Tuesday, Nov. 13, 1860. Two days ago there was in this city a body of men who were in favor of preserving the … Continue reading

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Lincoln’s Asks for Fair Trial

From The New-York Times. November 19, 1860: We find the following paragraph in the Washington Star: “A gentleman of this city (a well-known lumber merchant) visiting Springfield, Ill., lately, on some land business, was taken to see Mr. LINCOLN by … Continue reading

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Quashing Pro-Lincoln Sentiment

This paragraph from The New-York Times. on November 16, 1860 is in the news from Georgia section. If it appeared originally in any Georgia paper it would be the Savannah Republican. Exaggerated rumors were in circulation regarding a difficulty which … Continue reading

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Henry Clay on Secession

Henry Clay was called the “Great Compromiser” because of his work in the U.S. Congress during the North-South crises, especially in 1820 and 1850. The correspondent in this article says that Clay, who died in 1852, would not have compromised … Continue reading

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Could It Be?

From The New-York Times. November 15, 1860: The Columbus [Georgia] Times says: “We learn that on the night of the election, some negroes in this city were heard to shout for LINCOLN in the streets. The negroes must be better … Continue reading

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Palmetto State: Three Vignettes

Seven Score and Ten and Civil War Daily Gazette have been doing a great job keeping us up-to-date on the rabid secession fever in South Carolina since Lincoln’s election on November 6th (1860, of course). Here are three paragraphs from … Continue reading

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Plantation Owner Pins Hopes on Gridlock

And the Little Giant Agrees From The New-York Times. November 15, 1860: A FEW SEASONABLE WORDS. The National Intelligencer publishes the following letter from a “Southern Cotton Planter,” whom it states, is a gentleman of high character, a native of … Continue reading

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“Secession in New-York”

OK. I admit it – my eyes bulged out of my head when I read this headline from The New-York Times. The main idea was that Southern medical students met to decide whether, given Lincoln’s election and the secessionist activities … Continue reading

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Possible Rebellion – Against Alabama

According to The New-York Times the government of Alabama was making plans for a possible “Black Republican” victory in the 1860 presidential election at least 9 months earlier. Some freemen did not take kindly to what they viewed as unlawful … Continue reading

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