Category Archives: American Culture

beacon

You can check out the New York Tribune from 100 years ago today at the Library of Congress

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president’s day

Big doings in Washington, D. C. 150 years ago today as the nation’s capital commemorated the birthday of the martyred Abraham Lincoln.

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hot stove

I embrace hibernation. Reconstruction lacks the excitement of the combined naval-infantry assault on Fort Fisher (already a year ago), and it’s harder to find material. I might be historied out, but lying dormant for a bit sure seems good to … Continue reading

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a saint for the impecunious

From the Richmond Daily Dispatch December 23, 1865: The great problem of Christmas, with all who are not afflicted by the general malady of chronic impecuniousness, is what to buy for a Christmas present. The patron saint, Kriss Kringle, St. … Continue reading

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“From Maine to California”

150 years ago today was the day President Lincoln proclaimed as a day of Thanksgiving. The New-York Times saw it as a day that helped unite the states and parties and hoped it would remain a grand national holiday. From … Continue reading

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nursing the wounded

Yesterday while I was doing a little exploring at the Library of Congress, I discovered the image to the left of Walt Whitman, said to be “taken from life” in 1863 (apparently by Alexander Gardner). I read a few of … Continue reading

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Flour Power

From the Richmond Daily Dispatch March 5, 1863: Flour impressment. Major Tannahill, the Commissary of Post at Petersburg, received on Tuesday last an order to impress all the extra superfine flour in the possession of millers and merchants in that … Continue reading

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When?

From a Seneca County, New York newspaper in December 1862: “When Shall We Have Peace.” The Portland Advertiser, the leading Republican paper in Maine, asks the important and interesting question and answers it. We commend the answer to the careful … Continue reading

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Death of a Free Soiler

150 years ago yesterday Martin Van Buren died at the age of 79. He was the first president who was not born a British subject. He began his political career as a Democrat and served in Andrew Jackson’s administration as … Continue reading

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The Taxmen Searcheth

This cartoon, which you can read more about at the Library of Congress, was published in Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper on July 19, 1862. It referred to the Tax Act of July 1862. From the National Archives: To fund the … Continue reading

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