Category Archives: Postbellum Politics

the three wise men denigrated

150 years ago earlier this month Wendell Phillips seemed a bit miffed that Jefferson Davis had been bailed out back in May. From The New-York Times June 7, 1867: Jefferson Davis and His Friends. From the Anti-Slavery Standard of This … Continue reading

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pre-dawn queues

150 years ago today recently enfranchised black men in the District of Columbia once again took advantage of their new right to vote in large numbers at a local election. The presumably more progressive Republicans won  all the city-wide races … Continue reading

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southern radical Republicans

Mobilized in Mobile From The New-York Times May 4, 1867: Colored Convention in Mobile. MOBILE, Ala., Friday, May 3. A colored mass convention of the State has been in session here for two days, and adjourned to day. The delegates … Continue reading

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mega ice cube

Are you kidding? I’m kind of sitting here dumbfounded, double-checking the calendar, but it doesn’t seem to be April 1st yet. I mean, we paid how many U.S. (1867) dollars for what? A whole bunch of remote ice, they say. … Continue reading

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deposed by the feds

In mid-March 1867 General Philip Sheridan was appointed to command one of the five military districts that Congress created in the South. His Fifth District was made up of Texas and Louisiana. By the end of the month he had … Continue reading

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more ping-pong

On March 19, 1867 Congress passed a law to supplement the initial Reconstruction Act of March 2nd. The new law’s purpose was to to set up the machinery for beginning Congressional Reconstruction. It provided “for the registration of perspective voters … Continue reading

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Pottsville people power

It wasn’t just well-known radicals in and out of Congress. According to documentation at the Library of Congress, on March 11, 1867 some people in Pottsville, Pennsylvania promulgated a series of resolutions calling for the impeachment of President Andrew Johnson. … Continue reading

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Wade in waiting?

150 years ago today the 39th U.S. Congress ended and the 40th convened. This was an unusual move, but Congress wasn’t taking any chances. In the last days of the 39th, Congress enacted measures that curtailed President Johnson’s policies and … Continue reading

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in (and out) like a lion

On March 2, 1867 Andrew Johnson vetoed two bills as the 39th Congress was wrapping up its business. Both vetoes were immediately overridden by Congress. The Tenure of Office Act limited the President’s power to terminate certain appointees without the … Continue reading

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and the freedmen are ignorant?

In January 1867 the United States Congress passed a law over President Johnson’s veto that guaranteed the right to all men in the District of Columbia “without any distinction on account of color or race.” 150 years ago today black … Continue reading

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