Tag Archives: Ulysses S. Grant

summer schooled

During the mid-nineteenth century the United States Congress was not in session as much as it is today. In general, Congress did not meet from March until the following December. 1867 was a different kind of year. In March legislation … Continue reading

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the five commandants

Pursuant to the first Reconstruction Act enacted in early March 1867, President Andrew Johnson was required to appoint a district commander for each of the five military districts that divided up the South. On March 11th the president appointed Generals … Continue reading

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thanks for the schooling

The seventh Thanksgiving since Abraham Lincoln was elected president of the United States. President Andrew Johnson unobstreperously followed Mr. Lincoln’s example by proclaiming a national commemoration. According to an editorial in The New-York Times all the states went along, except … Continue reading

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no more rebels to fight

So far I haven’t noticed a letter from General William T. Sherman endorsing President Andrew Johnson’s reconstruction policy being published just before the 1866 elections in New York for its bombshell affect, but according to reports the general openly supported … Continue reading

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October surprise?

From a Seneca County, New York newspaper in October 1866: Gen. Sherman Endorses the President. The Washington correspondent of the New York Tribune, speaks of this distinguished General: “I am informed that General Sherman has made a second surrender to … Continue reading

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straggling home

150 years ago today President Andrew Johnson’s Swing Around the Circle tour concluded. According to the September 16, 1866 issue of the The New-York Times crowds in York Pennsylvania, Baltimore and Washington were mostly supportive with no reported heckling. From … Continue reading

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Johnstown calamity

Could it get any worse? 150 years ago today Andrew Johnson’s Swing Around the Circle tour rolled on from Pittsburgh to Harrisburg, PA. According to the September 15, 1866 issue of The New-York Times the crowds were generally enthusiastic along … Continue reading

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polite disagreement

150 years ago Andrew Johnson’s Swing Around the Circle was rolling and floating along. Unlike Cleveland and St. Louis, President Johnson didn’t care to make a stand against the hecklers who confronted him in Indianapolis on September 10th. As some … Continue reading

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“A Terbulent Crowd”

150 years ago today Andrew Johnson’s Swing Around the Circle tour rode the rails from St. Louis to Indianapolis. According to the September 11, 1866 issue of The New-York Times crowds were enthusiastic and polite along the way, especially enthusiastic … Continue reading

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short stop

On September 1, 1866 President Andrew Johnson’s swing around the circle tour stopped at a small town in the Finger Lakes region of New York. It was just a six minute stop as the train slowly progressed across the Empire … Continue reading

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