Tag Archives: Charleston

Sickles’ salient

After the war General Daniel Sickles commanded the army in South Carolina area. On March 11, 1867 he was appointed commander of the second military district (North and South Carolina) under Congress’s Reconstruction Acts. 150 years ago today he halted … Continue reading

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used furniture

According to the February 23, 1867 issue of The New-York Times, even though Washington’s Birthday had been a legal holiday in the state for four years, New York City’s celebration was rather subdued. Customs were slow to change and the … Continue reading

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Banned in Charleston

DURYEA’s ZOUAVES, the white regiment stationed at Charleston which refused to allow the negro soldiers full swing, was ordered from the city for this heinous offence. Afterwards their colors were demanded of them. The Colonel refused to give them up, … Continue reading

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May Day Memorial Day

It’s been over four years now since JASPER, The New-York Times’ correspondent wrote from Charleston in the seceded South Carolina. After the United States’ surrender of Fort Sumter in April 1861 JASPER was made to leave town. Now that Charleston … Continue reading

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puppet show?

From a Seneca County, New York newspaper in 1865 (in same column as the April 9, 1865 written communication between Generals Lee and Grant regarding surrender): JAMES REDPATH, the abolition leader, now the Charleston correspondent of the New York Tribune, … Continue reading

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“There has been great privation here — we need not deny it”

A fellow Richmond editor has died. The Dispatch has evidence from occupied Charleston to contradict President Lincoln’s second inaugural address: victorious Yankees would really act with malice toward all white Southerners. The paper also found evidence from General Sheridan’s recent … Continue reading

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neither snow nor rain …

but a rebellion might slow it down some About three weeks after federal troops occupied Charleston U.S. mail service had resumed from that city. From The New-York Times March 7, 1865: The First Mail from Charleston. PHILADELPHIA, Monday, March 6. … Continue reading

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tough “tug of war” ahead

It seems like it was a rough week 150 years ago for the Palmetto state, the first star on the Confederate flag. Columbia, South Carolina’s capital fell to Sherman’s army and much of the city burned. The next day Charleston, … Continue reading

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reconstruction bill

Four years to the day after South Carolina officially seceded from the United States, Richmond citizens could read about a bill in the Yankee Congress to manage the return of the rebel states: slavery would be forever abolished; provisional governors … Continue reading

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shrapnel

From the Richmond Daily Dispatch November 22, 1864: Killed in Bed by a shell. –During Sunday night, forty-one shots were fired at the city of Charleston, and on Monday, thirty-one, up to 6 P. M. A man and wife, named … Continue reading

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