Tag Archives: Daniel Sickles

bipartisan hoopla

Harold Holzer called Abraham Lincoln’s speech at the the Cooper Institute in New York City on February 27, 1860 his “watershed, the event that transformed him from a regional leader into a national phenomenon. Here the politician known as frontier … Continue reading

Posted in 150 Years Ago This Week, Aftermath, Postbellum Politics, Reconstruction, The election of 1868 | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on bipartisan hoopla

Sickles sacked

President Andrew Johnson made some changes in August 1867. He suspended Secretary of War Edwin Stanton and named General Ulysses Grant the ad interim War Secretary. The president then ordered the acting secretary to remove Phil Sheridan as commander of … Continue reading

Posted in 150 Years Ago This Week, Aftermath, Postbellum Politics, Postbellum Society, Reconstruction | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Sickles sacked

Sickles’ salient

After the war General Daniel Sickles commanded the army in South Carolina area. On March 11, 1867 he was appointed commander of the second military district (North and South Carolina) under Congress’s Reconstruction Acts. 150 years ago today he halted … Continue reading

Posted in 150 Years Ago This Week, Aftermath, Postbellum Society, Reconstruction, Southern Society | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on Sickles’ salient

the five commandants

Pursuant to the first Reconstruction Act enacted in early March 1867, President Andrew Johnson was required to appoint a district commander for each of the five military districts that divided up the South. On March 11th the president appointed Generals … Continue reading

Posted in 150 Years Ago This Month, Aftermath, Postbellum Society, Reconstruction | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on the five commandants

corrections

From The New-York Times January 24, 1867: No More Negroes to be Sold in Maryland … ANNAPOLIS, Wednesday, Jan. 23. The Maryland Legislature have passed an act abolishing an article in the code permitting the sale of negroes into slavery … Continue reading

Posted in 150 Years Ago This Week, Aftermath, Postbellum Politics, Postbellum Society, Reconstruction, Southern Society | Tagged , , , , , , | Comments Off on corrections

“the Government of Freedmen.”

150 years ago this week New Yorkers could read about South Carolina’s enactment of a Black Code for the governance of freedmen. Eric Foner summarizes the code, which: contained provisions, such as prohibiting the expulsion of aged freedmen from plantations, … Continue reading

Posted in 150 Years Ago This Week, Aftermath, Postbellum Society, Reconstruction, Southern Society | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on “the Government of Freedmen.”

“Is this Democratic?”

150 years ago today Daniel Sickles wrote a letter to Hugh Judson Kilpatrick criticizing the New Jersey Democrat 1865 platform (see last section of the linked post). Moreover, New Jersey Democrats were even lagging behind South Carolina: The party in … Continue reading

Posted in 150 Years Ago This Week, Aftermath, Postbellum Politics, Postbellum Society, Reconstruction | Tagged , , , , , , | Comments Off on “Is this Democratic?”

“devout joy at the salvation of the country”

From The New-York Times July 6, 1865: THE CELEBRATION OF INDEPENDENCE DAY. The observance of the National Anniversary was characterized everywhere throughout the country by a sober heartiness and earnest enthusiasm, in perfect keeping with the peculiarities of the occasion. … Continue reading

Posted in 150 Years Ago This Week, Aftermath, Northern Society, Reconstruction, Veterans | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on “devout joy at the salvation of the country”

Sickles’ turn at bat?

This might not be on par with the May 1863 capture of Richmond, but here an upstate New York newspaper prints the rumor that there has been another command change in the Army of the Potomac. On the other hand, … Continue reading

Posted in 150 Years Ago This Week, Military Matters | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on Sickles’ turn at bat?