Tag Archives: Edwin M. Stanton

suspended from office

A week earlier President Andrew Johnson tried to get around the strictures of the Tenure of Office Act by asking the most radical member of his cabinet secretaries to resign. Secretary of War Edwin Stanton refused. On August 12, 1867 … Continue reading

Posted in 150 Years Ago This Week, Aftermath, Postbellum Politics, Postbellum Society, Reconstruction | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

tethered in office?

Back in March 1867 the United States Congress passed the Tenure of Office Act over President Andrew Johnson’s veto. The act required that any federal officeholder whose appointment required the advice and consent of the Senate could only be removed … Continue reading

Posted in 150 Years Ago This Week, Aftermath, Postbellum Politics, Reconstruction | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on tethered in office?

summer schooled

During the mid-nineteenth century the United States Congress was not in session as much as it is today. In general, Congress did not meet from March until the following December. 1867 was a different kind of year. In March legislation … Continue reading

Posted in 150 Years Ago This Week, Aftermath, Postbellum Politics, Postbellum Society, Reconstruction | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off on summer schooled

in (and out) like a lion

On March 2, 1867 Andrew Johnson vetoed two bills as the 39th Congress was wrapping up its business. Both vetoes were immediately overridden by Congress. The Tenure of Office Act limited the President’s power to terminate certain appointees without the … Continue reading

Posted in 150 Years Ago This Week, Aftermath, Postbellum Politics, Reconstruction | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on in (and out) like a lion

pay-roll pay-off

From a Seneca County, New York newspaper in May 1865: The average pay due each soldier is $250, and the government is ready to pay off and discharge every man in both armies. The friends of General Sherman and Secretary … Continue reading

Posted in 150 Years Ago This Month, Aftermath, Military Matters, Veterans | Tagged , , | Comments Off on pay-roll pay-off

investigations

John Wilkes Booth was identified by a hat and a spur he left behind at the crime scene. From The New-York Times April 16, 1865: THE ASSASSINATION.; Additional Details of the Lamentable Event. WASHINGTON, Saturday, April 15. The assassin of … Continue reading

Posted in 150 Years Ago This Week, Lincoln Administration | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on investigations

“a sad peace-offering for us all”

From Personal Memoirs of U.S. Grant (in chapters 66 and 67): The head of Lee’s column came marching up there [near Appomattox Station] on the morning of the 9th, not dreaming, I suppose, that there were any Union soldiers near. … Continue reading

Posted in 150 Years Ago This Week, Maryland Campaign 1862 | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off on “a sad peace-offering for us all”

October surprise?

As the 1864 presidential election neared, a Democrat paper claimed that a Union assault on the Petersburg-Richmond front was politically motivated to create good war news for President Lincoln; the administration then covered up the failed attack. From a Seneca … Continue reading

Posted in 150 Years Ago This Week, Military Matters, Northern Politics During War, The election of 1864 | Tagged , , , , , , | Comments Off on October surprise?

EXECUTIVE Mansion

“The buck stops here,” but President Lincoln did not seem to have any role in the following account – except that a Democrat paper put his name in the headline. Still, it was probably a tasty story for the newspaper’s … Continue reading

Posted in 150 Years Ago This Month, Lincoln Administration, Military Matters, Northern Politics During War, The election of 1864 | Tagged , , | Comments Off on EXECUTIVE Mansion

when?

In the same issue that featured articles on Cold Harbor and the Georgia campaign and startling images of starved Union prisoners, the June 18, 1864 Harper’s Weekly (at Son of the South) published a poem by a member of President … Continue reading

Posted in 150 Years Ago This Week, Lincoln Administration, Northern Society | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on when?