Tag Archives: federalism

oh … canada

150 years ago today three British colonies up north joined together to make one Dominion of Canada – one British colony with four separate provinces (the colony of Canada was cleft in two). Most citizens were reportedly able to contain … Continue reading

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four score and ten

150 years ago today Massachusetts state representative George Bailey Loring delivered an Independence Day oration at Newburyport, Mass. He paid homage to Abraham Lincoln and declared the supremacy of the federal government. He disagreed with President Andrew Johnson’s objection to … Continue reading

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national hero

When the American Civil War broke began in 1861 the United States army was commanded by Winfield Scott, a native Virginian who was 74 years old and in ill health. In April 1861 General Scott wanted another career officer from … Continue reading

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it was all worth it

The war has been worth all that it cost the nation; the sacrifice has been great, but the benefit greater. President Andrew Johnson proclaimed December 7, 1865 a national Day of Thanksgiving. I don’t know if the first part of … Continue reading

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Whose Maryland?

150 years ago this week Gotham’s Times thought it was pretty funny that a presumed states-rights Democrat would appeal to the federal Constitution to negate Maryland’s election law. From The New-York Times September 8, 1865: The Democracy and State Rights. … Continue reading

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It’s up to Uncle Sam

For, disguise it as we may, the United States government really holds and exercises the power which gives vitality to the preliminaries of reconstruction, and it is therefore responsible for all evils in the future which shall spring from its … Continue reading

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clique politics

A war widow was passed over in the appointment of a Post Master in Penn Yan, New York. A Democrat paper showed that even a Republican paper disagreed with the decision. From a Seneca County, New York newspaper in July … Continue reading

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“in the twinkling of an eye”

From a Seneca County, New York newspaper in June 1865: Negro Suffrage. The radical element is very much excited over the President’s North Carolina proclamation, and an open rupture is threatened. The exclusion of the negro from the right of … Continue reading

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southern social war?

The National Government “has freed the four millions of slaves by its own deliberate acts, and it is bound to take care that this freedom shall benefit, and not injure them.” – hopefully with the support of the state governments … Continue reading

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free to vote?

150 years ago today President Johnson reportedly opined that the question of whether blacks should be allowed to vote in the South should be decided by loyal whites in the South. From The New-York Times May 26, 1865: The President … Continue reading

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