Tag Archives: Fort Sumter

Banned in Charleston

DURYEA’s ZOUAVES, the white regiment stationed at Charleston which refused to allow the negro soldiers full swing, was ordered from the city for this heinous offence. Afterwards their colors were demanded of them. The Colonel refused to give them up, … Continue reading

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this is the end …

From The New-York Times June 22, 1865: THE SUICIDE OF RUFFIN.; The Man who Fired the First Gun on Fort Sumter Blows His Brains Out He Prefers Death to Living Under the Government of the United States. Correspondence of the … Continue reading

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shotgun shorts

This article would have been published earlier than May 30, 1865 because even folks up here in New York state would already have known that Jefferson Davis was captured. From a Seneca County, New York newspaper in May 1865: The … Continue reading

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May Day Memorial Day

It’s been over four years now since JASPER, The New-York Times’ correspondent wrote from Charleston in the seceded South Carolina. After the United States’ surrender of Fort Sumter in April 1861 JASPER was made to leave town. Now that Charleston … Continue reading

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vengeance

It was supposed to be a very good Good Friday, at least for the Union. In a celebratory ceremony 150 years ago today Robert Anderson raised the old Union flag from April 1861 over Fort Sumter, which was once again … Continue reading

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time passages

“a time for war …” It has been almost four long years since Fort Sumter was surrendered to the Confederates. If you look back at April 1861 without considering the monotonous and/or agonizing day-by-day operations, it doesn’t seem that long … Continue reading

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tough “tug of war” ahead

It seems like it was a rough week 150 years ago for the Palmetto state, the first star on the Confederate flag. Columbia, South Carolina’s capital fell to Sherman’s army and much of the city burned. The next day Charleston, … Continue reading

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shrapnel

From the Richmond Daily Dispatch November 22, 1864: Killed in Bed by a shell. –During Sunday night, forty-one shots were fired at the city of Charleston, and on Monday, thirty-one, up to 6 P. M. A man and wife, named … Continue reading

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tough nut to shell

It’s already going on three years since the federal garrison at Fort Sumter was evacuated as the shooting war started. But the Union wasn’t content to leave with its tail between its legs. The North had been trying to retake … Continue reading

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hitting home

I know the feeling. When I read current events, I’m aware I don’t have the energy to feel compassion for all the constant death and destruction around our world. Also, for the most part, I’m very analytic reading about that … Continue reading

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