Tag Archives: William Tecumseh Sherman

no more rebels to fight

So far I haven’t noticed a letter from General William T. Sherman endorsing President Andrew Johnson’s reconstruction policy being published just before the 1866 elections in New York for its bombshell affect, but according to reports the general openly supported … Continue reading

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October surprise?

From a Seneca County, New York newspaper in October 1866: Gen. Sherman Endorses the President. The Washington correspondent of the New York Tribune, speaks of this distinguished General: “I am informed that General Sherman has made a second surrender to … Continue reading

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“compelled to inflict on them”

This commission is worthy of support, for it will relieve their necessities, and assuage the distress which we, in the course of this war, have been compelled to inflict on them. The American Union Commission held a big fundraiser at … Continue reading

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shotgun shorts

This article would have been published earlier than May 30, 1865 because even folks up here in New York state would already have known that Jefferson Davis was captured. From a Seneca County, New York newspaper in May 1865: The … Continue reading

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pay-roll pay-off

From a Seneca County, New York newspaper in May 1865: The average pay due each soldier is $250, and the government is ready to pay off and discharge every man in both armies. The friends of General Sherman and Secretary … Continue reading

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quiet kanawha

It had been real quiet for the New York First Veteran Cavalry in the Kanawha Valley, but our SENECA correspondent was able to report the April surrender of a small rebel force at Lewisburg on Appomattox terms. The veterans in … Continue reading

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mutual respect society

An editorial wasn’t too happy that William T. Sherman kept reporters away from General Johnston’s April 26, 1865 surrender; apparently General Sherman thought the Confederate officers would be embarrassed giving up in front of the gawking Yankee press. America would … Continue reading

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puncture … patched

From a Seneca County, New York newspaper in March 1865: The Progress of the War. On Saturday morning just before daybreak, three divisions of the enemy made a sudden and determined attack on Fort Steadman, in front of Petersburg, overpowering … Continue reading

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hold the applause

self-congratulatory applause, that is The following seems to have been published right around Inauguration Day 1865. Several Northern cities apparently held celebrations for recent victories and to mark President Lincoln’s second inauguration. New York’s was postponed two days because of … Continue reading

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tough “tug of war” ahead

It seems like it was a rough week 150 years ago for the Palmetto state, the first star on the Confederate flag. Columbia, South Carolina’s capital fell to Sherman’s army and much of the city burned. The next day Charleston, … Continue reading

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