Tag Archives: abolitionists

“pernicious isms of the day”

From a Seneca County, New York newspaper probably in 1866: FANATICS IN COUNCIL. – A so-called Equal Rights Convention was held at Rochester, on Tuesday and Wednesday last, at which a strolling company of mountebank performers, half male and half … Continue reading

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“power to enslave”

In early 1866 Congress debated a proposed Constitutional amendment that that would change the apportionment of representatives to Congress. According to the February 1, 1866 issue of The New-York Times the text read: ARTICLE – . Representatives and direct taxes … Continue reading

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don’t make ’em bite off too at once

150 years ago this week abolitionist George L. Stearns met with President Andrew Johnson to discuss Reconstruction in the South. Mr. Stearns wrote up his recollection of the meeting, had the president fact-check the summary, and then sent the document … Continue reading

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“We must accept our own ideas”

No man is fit to be an American statesman who is afraid of American ideas. Liberty is the boon of every man, and it carries with it civil rights and citizenship…. We must accept our own ideas. I believe in … Continue reading

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puppet show?

From a Seneca County, New York newspaper in 1865 (in same column as the April 9, 1865 written communication between Generals Lee and Grant regarding surrender): JAMES REDPATH, the abolition leader, now the Charleston correspondent of the New York Tribune, … Continue reading

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“on the edge of Niagara”

A famous abolitionist was pretty unimpressed with the author of the Emancipation Proclamation. From The New-York Times July 1, 1864: WENDELL PHILLIPS ON THE ADMINISTRATION.; Reasons Why He Cannot Support Lincoln and Johnson–Mr. Lincoln’s Re-election a Public Calamity. To the … Continue reading

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“equal liberty before the laws”

The April 9, 1864 issue of Harper’s Weekly (at Son of the South) eulogized an abolitionist Congressman from Illinois: OWEN LOVEJOY. IN OWEN LOVEJOY the cause of Democracy loses a noble champion. From the moment that he rose from the … Continue reading

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From DC to the Cooper

It certainly wasn’t a novelty for New York City’s Cooper Institute to host an abolitionist presentation, but 150 years ago this week the speaker was Anna Elizabeth Dickinson, the first woman to speak before the U.S. Congress. It looks like … Continue reading

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“salutary school of affliction”

It’s been almost two years since we’ve put up a report on Frederick Douglass speaking at New York City’s Cooper Institute. 150 years ago this week he spoke there again. The war was dragging on, and it had to be … Continue reading

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those duplicitous abolitionists

Nowadays Voodoo economics is a well-known phrase to question your political opponent’s intellectual ability or honesty. 150 years ago a Southern editorial said abolitionists’ claims that they wanted to free slaves was “moonshine philanthropy” – abolitionists really just wanted to … Continue reading

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